Monday, August 3, 2015

A Property Manager's Guide to ReConstruction Projects


      Every manager of multifamily projects will encounter a large re-construction project several times in his or her career. These may be planned projects or the result of an emergency. Planned projects include those that are routinely projected by building inspectors, architects, and other building professionals—re-painting; new roof coverings; re-paving of parking lots and streets. Emergencies usually involve previously unknown problems discovered in a forensic investigation or as the consequences of age.

       As residential housing gets older, construction projects become more complex and difficult. This complexity often results from those unplanned and unexpected discoveries. Age brings deterioration of components that years before would not have been considered at risk. A routine roof project, for example, may only require replacement of the roof covering when the project is say, 15 years old. But in an older project, where moisture has had years to accumulate in concealed wood components, not only the covering, but also the wood substrate may have to be replaced. The same is true with other components largely built of wood—balconies, staircases, entry decks, and framing under siding and stucco. These components may actually leak, but not enough to alert the occupants. Instead the moisture remains in the wood or in wall cavities and supports gradual decay over time. These issues add to the challenge of preparing an adequate scope of work because a good portion of the damage is concealed.

          As projects become more difficult, property managers find that they are responsible for a wider range of tasks--not only obtaining bids to do the work, but also for determining what experts to retain to investigate and determine the scope of that work; deciding who manages the contract; negotiation over the terms; and finding the funds to pay the contractor. This guide is intended to offer community and apartment managers assistance in managing a complex construction project including recommending and retaining appropriate professionals to determine the scope of work; construction contract and bid package essentials; administering the project; and handling disputes.

2 comments:

  1. Thank you for a very well thought-out post! It can definitely be a little harrowing when one thinks about all the bases that need covering when it comes to reconstruction, especially of a commercial property. I think the most important thing to remember is to keep a level head throughout the entire project; a clear mind works best, after all.

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